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CATNON trial (2nd interim analysis) and molecular and clinical implications of IDH-mutation type

The CATNON trial, 2nd interim analysis - prognostic factors, and the IDHwt tumors

The CATNON trial investigated the clinical benefit of adding temozolomide during and after radiotherapy in patients with anaplastic astrocytoma. The trial started in 2007, and since then the pivtal role of IDH mutaitons in diffuse glioma’s has been discovered. After a first interim analysis, we reported benefit to adjuvant temozolomide. With further follow-up and molecular analysis of the tumors of this 751 patients study, we can analyse the efficacy of temozolomide given during radiotherapy and in the various molecular subgroups

Molecular and clinical implication of IDH mutation type

Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene IDH1 and IDH2 occur at very high frequency in various tumor types. Interestingly, each tumour type has its own mutation spectrum, though all hotspot mutations are able to produce the oncometabolite D-2-hydroxuglutarate (D-2HG). The various mutations however, differ in their ability to produce D-2HG. In this webinar, we argue that the type of IDH mutation that is present in the tumour affects molecular pathways and has clinical consequences for astrocytoma patients.

Date: Wednesday 20 October 2021
Time: 3.00pm BST
Duration: 1 hour 15 minutes

Overview of the webinar

CATNON trial 

  • Outline of the CATNON trial and limitations
  • Adjuvant temozolomide improves outcome in patients with IDHmt anaplastic astroctyoma
  • No beneficial effects of temozolomide observed in patients with IDH wt tumors, or in tumors with molecular features of glioblastoma
  • MGMT promoter methylation status did not impact outcome in patients with IDHwt tumors
  • Several clinical and molecular prognostic factors were identified that can help in individual patient prognostication
  • The type of IDH mutation is associated with specific gene expression profiles

Molecular and clinical implications of IDH mutation type

  • Tumour types differ in their IDH mutation spectrum
  • Gliomas have an exceptionally high frequency of IDH1-R132H mutations
  • The type of mutation is associated with the genome-wide DNA methylation levels
  • The type of IDH mutation is associated with specific gene expression profiles
  • The type of IDH mutation is associated with patient survival in astrocytoma patients

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Meet the speakers

Professor Martin van den Bent

Head of the Neurooncology Unit, Erasmus MC Cancer Center, and Professor of Neurooncology, Erasmus University.

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Professor Martin van den Bent

Prof Dr Martin J. van den Bent trained as a neurologist. In 1992, he joined the Neuro-Oncology Unit of Erasmus MC Cancer Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. In 2007 he was appointed as Professor of Neuro-Oncology at Erasmus University. He has been the principle investigator of many international multicenter phase II and III trials on both high- and low- grade glial tumors that contributed to the standard of care of glioma patients. From 2003 to 2009 he was the chair of the EORTC Brain Tumor Group. Between 2018 and 2020 he was president of the European Association of NeuroOncology (EANO), and is currently the chair of the EANO guideline committee.  Prof van den Bent served on several ASCO committees including a committee on guidelines for molecular diagnostics in glioma. He is a repeat recipient of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) Award for Excellence in Clinical Research.

Dr Pim French

Erasmus Medical Centre, The Netherlands

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Dr Pim French

Dr French's lab is part of the Erasmus MC Cancer Institute and forms an integral part of its ‘brain tumour center’. Research is done in close collaboration with the Neuro-Oncology clinic and often involves high-throughput analysis on well-defined patient cohorts. His group focus on the translational research of glial brain tumors (gliomas) with the aim to identify clinically relevant subgroups of glioma. In addition, the lab performs functional analysis on genes involved in glioma-genesis. By better understanding the pathobiology of gliomas, he ultimately aims to help improve the often dismal prognosis of glioma patients.

A state-of-the-art platform for speakers to engage with the UK and international neuro-oncology community, where presenting our new data has directly led to several potential future collaborations which will move our research forward even faster.

Dr Ruman Rahman, Associate Professor of Molecular Neuro-oncology, University of Nottingham

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The webinar is free to join and will be held using Zoom. Help on how to use Zoom can be found here.

If you’ve any questions, or would like to present your data at one of our future webinars, please contact the Research team on research@thebraintumourcharity.org or call +44 (0)1252 418190.

Date: Wednesday 20 October 2021
Time: 3.00pm BST
Duration: 1 hour 15 minutes

Speakers:
Professor Martin van den Bent
Dr Pim French

Register now