Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC)

Through this partnership we're excited to be partnering with the Structural Genomics Consortium, funding two researchers who will be searching for new drugs that can be used in the treatment of brain tumours. These two positions will be based in Oxford, UK and Toronto, Canada.

This pioneering partnership, in which only a handful of charities are involved, will help us pave the way for the future of research into brain tumours and will help us get closer to achieving our goal of doubling survival and halving the harm that brain tumours have on quality of life.

Dr Lee - Programme Director at the SGC

We're proud to be just one of a handful of charities working with the SGC. We caught up with Wen Hwa Lee (“Lee") from the SGC to learn more about the project and what it can mean for us.

What is the SGC?

We're an international group of researchers using cutting-edge science to accelerate the discovery of potential treatments for incurable diseases. What makes us different from other projects however, is that we share all of our findings, regardless of the result, and we never file patents on our discoveries – this way we ensure complete freedom to operate for any scientist to join in tackling brain tumours. Any information we uncover is also available free of charge, meaning that others never have to repeat the research we've undertaken. It's important to us that research always takes a step forward, never a step back.

What does your work involve?

We're working to unlock information about the structure and function of different proteins within the human body. By discovering the shape of the proteins which play a part in causing particular diseases - such as brain tumours - we can hope to develop drugs that 'lock on' to them and change their behaviour.

What does the partnership mean for us?

Being one of just a few charities who have entered this type of agreement, The Brain Tumour Charity are driving the next generation of fundamental discoveries forward. As part of the partnership, The Charity will be funding two research posts within the SGC focusing specifically on the proteins and biology that play a part in brain tumour development.

What is the potential impact of your work?

Our work has the potential to fundamentally change the way research for incurable diseases is approached, and that's why we're so pleased to have The Brain Tumour Charity involved. We're accelerating progress and encouraging global collaboration on all fronts - several global pharmaceutical companies and researchers from around the world have already signed up to our model of sharing scientific discoveries, and this can only be of benefit to the future.