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Young Ambassadors

Our Young Ambassadors are an integral part of The Brain Tumour Charity. They help us to raise awareness of brain tumours and are passionate about changing the future for those affected.

The two-year Young Ambassador programme is for young adults aged 18-25. We currently have 23 Young Ambassadors along with a team of Young Ambassador Mentors.

Our Young Ambassadors support The Charity in many ways, including:

  • representing The Charity and sharing their stories
  • championing HeadSmart, our early diagnosis campaign, and BRIAN, our online app
  • supporting others at events, Meet Ups and Family Days, as well as in our Young Adults Facebook Group
  • raising awareness of The Charity and brain tumours so we can find a cure faster.

As well as supporting other teenagers and young adults affected by a brain tumour diagnosis, their ideas and input have been vital in shaping our Young Adult Service and developing our resources.

By being part of the programme, our Young Ambassadors not only play an important role in our work, but it also gives them the opportunity to develop and learn new skills (such as public speaking or social media promotion). They also get to meet and socialise with others their own age who have been through similar experiences.

See what the Young Ambassadors get up to

Meet our Young Ambassadors 2021

Alice
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Alice

"I wanted to become a Young Ambassador in memory of my mum who died of a brain tumour - I’ve always wanted to do something in her honour and help other people who might have gone through similar."

Alice
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Alice

"I wanted to become an ambassador for The Brain Tumour Charity because I want to raise more awareness and give more support to those who are in need of comfort in a difficult time. Unfortunately, when my Grandad passed away from a glioblastoma in 2012, I didn’t receive much support being so young (not discovering this amazing Charity!) I really struggled dealing with grief and just needed someone to support me. I wouldn’t want anyone else to feel alone, the same way I did once I lost my grandad. Support, love and comfort is everything you need when you are on a journey like this - and that is what I would love to give to The Charity."

Amy
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Amy

"Losing my mum to a brain tumour, at such a young age, has been the hardest thing I have ever had to face. I want to be a Young Ambassador to help provide support to others who have been through or are going through something similar. I want to not only help raise awareness of brain tumours, but also help to raise awareness of the effects that it has on the loved ones. I felt that I lost my mum long before she passed, as her tumour changed her in many ways. I wish I had opened up more on how this affected me, so I would love to be a support to others going through this struggle."

Anna
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Anna

"Having lost my father to a brain tumour back in 2011, when I was just 13 years old, The Brain Tumour Charity is a cause that is incredibly close to my heart. I feel like I’m finally in a position where I want to share my story and turn a very sad situation into a positive one. I could think of no better way to do that than joining the Young Ambassador programme!"

Dhwani
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Dhwani

"I wanted to become a Young Ambassador to spread awareness about the condition and about symptoms, to promote early diagnosis."

Emma
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Emma

"I wanted to become a Young Ambassador because my brother was recently diagnosed with a brain tumour, and I wanted to do something to make a difference for my family and my brother. I am hoping to make a change and to support The Charity."

Emma
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Emma

"After caring for my dad before he passed away I wanted to join a group of like-minded people who understood what I had been through. I also really want to help raise awareness and improve education surrounding brain tumours."

Gemma
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Gemma

"I became a Young Ambassador as I am passionate about the work of The Brain Tumour Charity and wanted to be part of a community of young people making a positive difference by working towards the charity’s goals.

Before my Mum’s brain tumour diagnosis, I had no knowledge of brain tumours. I was shocked to learn the harrowing statistics that brain tumours are the biggest cancer killer of children and adults under 40, yet less than 3% of the UK’s spend on cancer research is spent on brain tumours. I am therefore motivated to raise awareness, support those going through and affected by a diagnosis, and campaign to fight for a cure. Representing The Brain Tumour Charity feels the perfect way to honour my Mum’s memory."

Jazz
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Jazz

"Having been given a diagnosis I have felt the immense strain it created for me and my family. I can barely begin to imagine how I might have reacted if my diagnosis had been worse. These experiences linked me with the remarkable work of the Brain Tumour Charity. 

Being diagnosed with a brain tumour can be terrifying. However, having experienced the support the Brain Tumour Charity have to offer, I want to help them make a difference to others’ lives in my role as a Young Ambassador."

Jeremy
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Jeremy

"When my Dad was diagnosed with a brain tumour in November 2017 it turned my life completely upside down. Seeing him suddenly rapidly deteriorate just felt so cruel and unfair. After he devastatingly passed away, I undertook an eight week fundraising challenge where I cycled around Britain in search of the best breakfast this nation has to offer. There was something really special about cycling from town to town up and down country sharing experiences with others who have lost loved ones to Brain Tumours. In the end the ‘Tour de Full English’ raised over £36,000! After getting a taste of what it was like working with the Brain Tumour Charity, I really wanted to give the application process a go. The charity does such incredible work in fundraising for a cure and I’d love to do all I can to be part of it!"

Kajal
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Kajal

"My Dad unfortunately lost his 18-month battle with a grade 4 Glioblastoma last July. I witnessed first-hand just how debilitating this illness was for Dad, but in many ways, it was just as debilitating for my Mum, sisters and I too. Whilst it would be far too easy for me to dwell in bitterness, frustration and disappointment, I know that my Dad would not want this for me. Being a Young Ambassador means that I’m able to direct my energy into something positive whilst keeping the memory of the greatest man I’ve ever known alive."

Kate
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Kate

"I wanted to become a Young Ambassador because I would like to become more confident in myself and also become more confident talking about my tumour and how it affects me. I would like to help The Charity as it has helped me so much. I would also like to campaign for better and faster treatment for people with low grade tumours like mine."

Lauren
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Lauren

"I became a Young Ambassador because I am so passionate to want to make a positive change to an individual’s life who has been diagnosed with a brain tumour. All individuals deal with the symptoms and side effects of a Brain Tumour differently, but everyone deserves to have support around them to talk to or to take comfort from being around someone who understands what they are going through.

Being diagnosed with a brain tumour is scary and can be physically and emotionally draining. I feel very fortunate to have been given a second chance at life as a survivor of a brain tumour and now want to make a difference to help others by being a kind, friendly and caring face to a growing support network."

Madelaine
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Madelaine

"Becoming a Young Ambassador offers me the invaluable opportunity to have direct involvement with a cause so personal and important to me. Connecting with people who share similar experiences and passions creates a community of mutual support and motivation that I can’t wait to be a part of.

With my mum being diagnosed with a brain tumour and epilepsy when I was just 6 months old, I know the effects such an illness can have on a family. Due to this, I have a huge appreciation for the work The Brain Tumour Charity undertakes, and look forward to the chance to get more involved in their life changing work."

Madi
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Madi

"When my dad was diagnosed with a brain tumour, I didn't realise the amount of support and opportunities that were available to me. I'd like to be able to share information and fundraise to make a difference, to carry on my dad's legacy."

Olivia
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Olivia

"I wanted to become a Young Ambassador because I think it is really important to help other people who are going through or have been through a similar situation. As it is not an easy experience, I would love to just be someone who listens and understands those who feel lost or as if they are alone in their situation."

Rebecca
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Rebecca

"I’m excited to become a Young Ambassador to support other young people who are affected by brain tumours. The research and support available now, compared to when I had my treatment ten years ago, is phenomenal, and I’m really looking forward to engaging with other young people going through similar experiences. I’m excited to get involved in lots of fundraising and awareness events and help raise the profile of research into brain tumours."

Rhudi
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Rhudi

"I became a Young Ambassador to be there for people and their loved ones who have been impacted by a brain tumour, as well as to help raise awareness for brain tumours (especially in the UK) because I know it is a problem, through personal experience. I believe my story has the potential to make an impact and I would like to get involved in campaigns that involve speaking to policy makers and the media about how to tackle brain tumour awareness and diagnosis."

Sophie
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Sophie

"I became a Young Ambassador as I want to make change, would like to make new friends and try to help improve research for brain tumours."

Victoria
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Victoria

"My dad passed away from a secondary brain tumour three years ago. My life completely flipped upside down and I didn’t receive any support from my university. I couldn’t think of a future without my dad. Between supporting my mum and brothers, moving university, selling our family home, studying, worrying about finances, working a part-time job and missing my dad, I struggled to face how I was feeling. 

I began writing articles and speaking at events about my experience of grief and brain tumours and campaigning to increase mental health support for people in further education. Sharing my story enabled me to sort through my thoughts, motivations and feelings to begin to come to terms with dad’s passing whilst figuring out how to feel happy again. I want to try and support others who are going through similar experiences and share how I view life now: I feel lucky to have every day I do with the people I love and I’d like to do all I can to do a bit of good in the world to make someone else’s experience slightly less lonely. 

Before my dad’s diagnosis, I didn’t know about the stats and figures surrounding brain tumours. I want to raise awareness of the impacts on patients and their families and pioneer for an increase in research into brain tumours."

It’s the most fun I’ve had and it’s so great being involved with The Charity, it’s such a lovely family to be a part of. I’ve learnt to be more confident in what I can do but I’ve also made some really good friends and an amazing support network.

Molly, current Young Ambassador

Why I'm an Ambassador

Luke, April, Chandos, Hannah, Harry, Rebecca, Tom, Emma and Bradey, from our first group of Young Ambassadors, share their aims as Young Ambassadors and how they want to change the future for those affected by brain tumours.

Our new strategy

Find out how we're leaning into our strengths and our community, to make sure we can continue to drive urgent progress for everybody affected by a brain tumour.