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Young Ambassadors

Our Young Ambassadors are an integral part of The Brain Tumour Charity. They help us to raise awareness of brain tumours and are passionate about changing the future for those affected.

The two-year Young Ambassador programme is for young adults aged 18-25. We currently have 20 Young Ambassadors along with a team of Young Ambassador Mentors.

Our Young Ambassadors support The Charity in many ways, including:

  • Attending information days and launches of our latest reports
  • Volunteering at events
  • Helping raise awareness of brain tumours, to ultimately defeat them

They have also been involved in developing our Young Adult Service and offer support to other teenagers and young adults affected by a brain tumour diagnosis.

By being part of the programme, our Young Ambassador's not only play an important role in our work, but it also gives them the opportunity to develop and learn new skills (such as their communication and public speaking skills) as well meet and socialise with others their own age who have been through similar experiences.

See what the Young Ambassadors get up to

Meet our Young Ambassadors 2019

Alice

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Alice

"I became a Young Ambassador for two reasons: I wanted to help others who had been through a similar experience to myself, as well as raise public awareness of brain tumours to help advance research. When my Dad passed away three years ago, I became very insular; I rarely spoke about his passing, not even with those closest to me. I want to be someone who people feel they can open up to when they are ready. Also, a few months after my Dad’s passing, my Mum ran the London Marathon and raised £1911 for The Brain Tumour Charity. I would love to follow in her footsteps, helping raise funds to find a cure for brain tumours, and encouraging others to do the same."

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Allana

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Allana

"Becoming a Young Ambassador is an adventure I cannot wait to begin! I hope to raise awareness, gain friends but most importantly I want to give support where I can which I hope my story will help others too."

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Amie

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Amie

"I became a Young Ambassador because my grandad unfortunately passed away from a glioblastoma multiforme when I was 14. Seeing his personality change so much really scared and upset me, so I want to help raise awareness and also make information more accessible and understandable, so more people know what they may encounter. Also I want to make current and ongoing research more understandable to those who don't have a scientific background, and so people know what is currently being done to tackle brain tumours. Furthermore, I want to help inspire the next generation of researchers, who could contribute to curing a cancer."

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Becca

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Becca

"I became a Young Ambassador as when someone you love is diagnosed with a brain tumour you can often feel helpless and I thought by becoming a Young Ambassador I could do something proactive to fight this dreadful disease and help others like my Dad. Before my Dad was diagnosed I had no idea that Brain tumours were so prominent, being the biggest cancer killer of children and adults under 40. I hope by raising both awareness and funds I can help to be part of the force working to find a cure sooner whilst also supporting those affected in any way I can."

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Chantal

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Chantal

"This time last year I was just a regular young girl working as a Neurosurgical Anaesthetic Practitioner, not knowing I was about to be given a very ironic life altering brain tumour diagnosis! I became a Young Ambassador because I felt that I was already living by a lot of the values that the YA’s possessed and it would be the perfect way to channel my positive attitude. Not only is it a great platform for me to more widely support others through events but it allows me contribute more to the charity that I am most passionate about - and of course finding a cure! However, most importantly, it allows me to make 20+ new friends who are all affected by brain tumours in some way!"

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Chelsea

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Chelsea

"I originally signed up to become a Young Ambassador of The Brain Tumour Charity as I felt like I could offer support for other young adults who are experiencing other symptoms/news that I had to endeavour when I received the news of my own brain tumour."

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Ellen

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Ellen

"I want to become a Young Ambassador to make change, raise awareness for an amazing charity and support others who are going through what me and my family have gone through."

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Ellie

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Ellie

"I became a Young Ambassador to meet others that have gone through the same thing. Help to raise awareness of brain tumour early symptoms, so there’s a chance someone might not have to go through the ‘stuff’ I have."

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Elliott

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Elliott

"The reason I wanted to become a Young Ambassador was so I can help support and listen others that are both going and gone through difficult situations, and be there for them to talk to. Having been with the charity before and experiencing that sense of understanding with someone, made a positive difference to me; and I am thankful to have an opportunity to do this. Being part of this extending family allowed me to feel confident with myself and I want this feeling to extend to the many people I would get to meet. Finally by doing this I can spread the values of the charity and bring more awareness to brain tumours in young people; showing that if we can assist each other we can do anything."

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Emeline

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Emeline

"I became a Young Ambassador because the support I got from them after I got diagnosed was so important and helped me feel less alone and I want to share that with other young people. A brain tumour diagnosis is so scary and isolating and to just offer a little bit of comfort to someone else in the same situation would mean the world."

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Emma

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Emma

"I wanted to become a Young Ambassador because I know first-hand just how tough living with a brain tumour can be. Recently I have become more involved with the Brain Tumour Charity and really recognise the important work they do.

As a Young Ambassador I can support other people regardless of their age, type of tumour and what stage of their journey they are at. This is really important as brain tumours often cause people to feel isolated and I am always willing to listen, no one should feel like they have to go through things alone.

By sharing my story, I want to spread the word about what it is like to live with a tumour and help other people to feel more comfortable with their diagnosis and positive about their futures. I am also really looking forward to getting involved in as many of the charity’s events as possible and raising much needed awareness of brain tumours and their symptoms."

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Georgia

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Georgia

"I became a Young Ambassador to promote better mental health in young people who are going through or have been through a brain tumour diagnosis. I want to use my experiences to encourage others to open up about what they are really feeling without being scared or embarrassed. I love working with children and their families and I want to be part of the community at the forefront of brain tumour care and research."

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Hannah

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Hannah

"I became a Young Ambassador to help young adults like myself feel less alone when going through a brain tumour diagnosis."

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Izzy

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Izzy

"I want to give something back as I’ve been helped by so many other charities and I want to give my experiences to help others"

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Jade

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Jade

"I became a young ambassador because I thought it would be a fun thing to do and also I can help others like myself have a fun day doing something without saying anything about our treatment or what we have been through as we are all similar but in our own different ways."

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Laura

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Laura

"I decided to became a Young Ambassador to use my experience having brain tumours to help improve treatment and increase funding for those suffering with tumours. Being an ambassador will also allow me to make friends with people with similar experiences whilst also expanding my skill set in areas like public speaking"

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Molly

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Molly

"I became a Young Ambassador as I wanted to connect with other people who have had similar experiences to myself whilst also feeling like I was giving back to a charity that has supported me so much! "

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Molly

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Molly

"I became a Young Ambassador in hope of helping people going through what I went through, and also to raise awareness into brain tumours and their symptoms so more people can get an early diagnosis."

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Rosie

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Rosie

"I really want to help raise awareness, to help people through their journey, and make a difference to their lives, this is something I feel would be very rewarding. I would love to be able to talk to people who have been through a similar experience to me, and am excited about meeting inspiring people As well as being able to help others, I feel like I would get so much out of this role myself."

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Sabrina

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Sabrina

"I became a Young Ambassador to join the battle of defeating brain tumours sooner. Following my own experience in 2014, I was devastated to learn that brain tumours are the biggest killer of cancer in people aged under 40 but remains the least funded and researched. This upsetting statistic became my main motivation to share my story, in hope to raise awareness and promote the importance of brain tumour research.

Being diagnosed during my teenage years, I'm also a passionate advocate of The Brain Tumour Charity's 'HeadSmart' campaign; raising awareness of the common symptoms of brain tumours in young adults and children with an aim of accelerating diagnosis time and increasing survival rates. My tumour had been growing undetected for several years, only reaching a diagnosis weeks before the risk of becoming paralysed. Although I have a profound appreciation for being diagnosed in time, it proves that there is much work to be done to acknowledge the illness sooner.

I'm very grateful to be given this platform to contribute in helping to improve the future of brain tumours. I consider myself a very fortunate survivor and now aspire to help others by being another friendly face in the growing support network and helping affected individuals through what can feel like a very isolating time in their life."

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Shane

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Shane

"I became a Young Ambassador because having a brain tumour has had a huge impact on my life. Even though I am cured, there are still so many problems that I have to face every day. If I can help raise awareness/do something good for an amazing cause, then I can rest assured that I have turned my negative times into a positive! I’d love to be able to work with other people facing similar situations."

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Sunil

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Sunil

"Brain tumours cause a wide range of side effects and symptoms most are invisible to the people around us. These can have a significant impact on daily life. Disclosing the struggles caused by these side effects can be difficult because of the fear of judgment and disbelief. This can make having a brain tumour not only physically and emotionally draining but also quite a lonely experience. I hope by breaking down my emotional barriers and sharing my story, I can instil some trust in someone else to share their story with me.

I became a Young Ambassador to help make this journey a little less lonely for as many people as possible and their families. But I intend on doing so much more to help bring brain tumours to the spotlight to raise awareness in the belief it will aid in shortening diagnosis time."

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Yasmin

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Yasmin

"I became a Young Ambassador because I am so passionate about data research, and being able to meet people and put across feedback and views on things so people are more aware and able to talk more, brain tumours are not always the most common thing in regards to cancer and being at a meet up with teenage cancer trust with the cancer registry it came across a strong aspect for me to be involved in. And I’ve found people feel lost, let down and with no one to talk to about something so different. When the result showed 97 % of people diagnosed with brain tumours wanted to know more on the cancer registry that is where it all started for me.. and I’ve always wanted to speak mainly to people about NO GOOGLING ON BRAIN TUMOURS. All about the talks out in the open and listening for me, I never give in and like people to feel not the odd one out."

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"Being a Young Ambassador means that I can turn an isolating and negative experience in to a fulfilling one. Brain tumours are underfunded, under researched and under acknowledged, I seek to change this through sharing my story, raising awareness and encouraging people to help fund further research."

April, a member of our first Young Ambassadors group

Why I'm an Ambassador

Luke, April, Chandos, Hannah, Harry, Rebecca, Tom, Emma and Bradey, from our first group of Young Ambassadors, share their aims as Young Ambassadors and how they want to change the future for those affected by brain tumours.

We're raising the benchmark

We've been recognised as Charity of the Year 2018 for our pioneering approach, innovative research solutions and, above all, our community-centred approach to everything we do.