Close navigation

Craniopharyngioma research

Craniopharyngiomas are low grade tumours which usually occur in children. Because of their location, near the pituitary gland and optic nerve, they can have a serious impact on quality of life.

Current treatment involves surgery and radiotherapy as there are no targeted treatments for this tumour type, which highlights the need for more research in this area.

Current craniopharyngioma research projects

Here are the research projects we are currently funding that relate to understanding or treating craniopharyngiomas.

Dr Todd Hankinson

Identifying directed therapies for Adamantinomatous Craniopharyngioma (ACP)

share this

Dr Todd Hankinson

Identifying directed therapies for Adamantinomatous Craniopharyngioma (ACP)

Adamantinomatous Craniopharyngioma (ACP) is a devastating brain tumour occurring in children. Due to the location of the tumour – near the pituitary gland, optic nerve and hypothalamus – it is associated with the worst quality of life scores of any childhood brain tumour.

ACP tumours are heterogeneous, which means they are made up of different types of cells. The aim of the research programme, led by Dr Todd Hankinson, is to understand the behaviour of the different types of cells and identify targets for treatment.

Find out more

share this

Other current research projects

Here are the research projects we are currently funding that relate to understanding or treatment of childhood brain tumours including craniopharyngiomas.

Dr David Jones

The Everest Centre

share this

Dr David Jones

The Everest Centre

The Everest Centre is being financed by The Brain Tumour Charity with money raised by the family and friends of Toby Ritchie, who was diagnosed with a low grade brain tumour at the age of five.

The centre will fund several, vital research projects that will help us understand more about low grade paediatric brain tumours and trial new treatments.

Find out more

share this

Prof. Colin Kennedy

The PROMOTE Study

share this

Professor Colin Kennedy

The PROMOTE Study

The project is named The PROMOTE Study - Patient Reported Outcome Measures Online To Enhance Communication and Quality of Life after childhood brain tumour.

The PROMOTE team are developing an online programme called KLIK which will be used by children and their families to keep track of any issues they have between consultations.

This research will propel our ability to understand, and potentially prevent, the harsh side effects of brain tumour treatment in children to help accelerate a change for those affected.

Find out more

share this

Dr Lee Wong

Investigating tumour initiating events

share this

Dr Lee Wong

Investigating tumour initiating events

Previous research has demonstrated that chromatin regulation is often disrupted in many cancers. Mutations, or changes, in histone proteins leads to the initiation of many cancers, including gliomas.

The aim of the research, led by Dr Wong, is to understand the role of a specific histone protein, called H3.3, and how changes in this protein drive tumour growth.

Survival rates for individuals diagnosed with gliomas depend on a host of factors, but only 19% of adults diagnosed with a brain tumour survive for five years after their diagnosis. So it’s important that further research is done to inform our understanding of how and why these tumours start.

Find out more

share this

Dr Jan Schuemann

Extreme dose rate proton therapy

share this

Dr Jan Schuemann

Extreme dose rate proton therapy

Previous studies have shown that delivering radiotherapy extremely rapidly can dramatically reduce side-effects. Radiation therapy that delivers the same dose of radiation in a much shorter period of time is called extreme dose radiation (EDR). EDR therapy has not been tested using proton beams, and that’s where this innovative research project comes in.

The research team, led by Dr Schuemann, will use pre-clinical models to test EDR proton therapy with the aim of establishing a treatment regimen that’s effective and well-tolerated by people. They’ll compare EDR to conventional radiation delivery and look for any differences in side-effects, specifically looking into the effects on cognition and motor control.

Learn more

share this