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Posteria fossa syndrome

Your child's neurosurgeon will explain the risks associated with surgery on their medulloblastoma, including a condition known as posteria fossa syndrome.

What is it?

Surgery in the areas to the rear of the skull, also known as the posterior fossa or cerebellum, can cause long lasting negative effects in children. These effects include loss of muscle tone, memory troubles, unsteadiness, and decreased ability to talk. These effects are collectively known as Cerebellar Mutism Syndrome (CMS) or Posterior Fossa Syndrome.

Posteria fossa syndrome develops in around 25% of children with medulloblastoma, with symptoms generally appearing one to three days after surgery. Symptoms can continue for months to years and can vary from child to child. The following symptoms are only a guide, but may include:

  • weakness in one side of the body
  • loss of speech
  • difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • facial paralysis on one side
  • poor balance (ataxia)

Get support

If you need someone to talk to or advice on where to get help, we offer a wide range of inclusive and accessible support services for everyone affected by a brain tumour.